Charter Golf, Inc., manufactures and sells golf apparel and supplies. Ken Odin had worked as a Charter sales representative for six months when he…

Charter Golf, Inc., manufactures and sells golf apparel and supplies. Ken Odin had worked as a Charter sales representative for six months when he was offered a position with a competing fi rm. Charter’s president, Jerry Montieth, offered Odin a 10 percent commission “for the rest of his life” if Ken would turn down the offer and stay on with Charter. He also promised that Odin would not be fi red unless he was dishonest. Odin turned down the competitor’s offer and stayed with Charter. Three years later, Charter fi red Odin for no reason. Odin sued, alleging breach of contract. Using the information presented in the chapter, answer the following questions. 1. Would a court likely decide that Montieth’s employment contract with Odin falls within the Statute of Frauds? Why or why not? 2. Assume that the court does fi nd that the contract falls within the Statute of Frauds and that the state in which the court sits recognizes every exception to the Statute of Frauds discussed in the chapter. What exception provides Odin with the best chance of enforcing the oral contract in this situation? 3. Now suppose that Montieth had taken out a pencil, written “10 percent for life” on the back of a register receipt, and handed it to Odin. Would this satisfy the Statute of Frauds? Why or why not? 4. Assume that Odin had signed a written employment contract at the time he was hired by Charter, but it was not completely integrated. Would a court allow Odin to present parol evidence of Montieth’s subsequent promises

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