PHI208 Ashford University Week 2 Going Deeper The Trolley Problem Reflection

Question Description

After reading Chapter 3 of the textbook, consider the following scenario, taken from “Going Deeper: The Trolley Problem”:

What if you could save five lives in a way that results in the death of a single person? If the overall consequences were the same, would it matter if you were intentionally harming that person or not? This problem is raised by the philosopher Philippa Foot (2002c) in her famous “trolley problem.”

Imagine that you are standing next to a railroad track, and a runaway train is careening down the track. In the path of the train are five workers (let’s suppose they cannot escape the path of the train; perhaps they are in the middle of a long, narrow bridge high above a ravine). You know that if the train continues on its path, it will certainly kill those five workers.

However, you see that there is a sidetrack, and on the sidetrack is a single worker. Let’s also suppose that you know that if the train goes onto the sidetrack, that single worker will be killed.

As it happens, you are standing next to a lever that can send the train onto the sidetrack. Therefore, you are faced with a decision: to pull the lever and send the train to the sidetrack, killing the one worker but sparing the five, or do nothing and allow the train to continue on its course, killing the five workers.

[There is an interactive illustration of this in your textbook, so be sure to take a look]

Now consider this slight variation:

Instead of standing next to a lever that can switch the train to another track, you are standing on a bridge overlooking the track, and next to you is a very large man (think someone the size of an NFL lineman – someone who is just big, not necessarily obese or otherwise unhealthy). He’s leaning precariously over the railing such that barely a push would send him over the railing and onto the tracks. Let’s suppose that he’s large enough to stop the train, thus sparing the five workers, but his own life will be lost. Let’s also suppose that you aren’t large enough to stop the train, so it would do no good to throw yourself over.

Should you throw the large man over the bridge?

In the course of the week’s discussion, you will need to do the following (not necessarily in this order):

  • Engage with the text:

What would a utilitarian say is the right action in each of the cases? Give the reasoning by referring to Chapter 3 of the textbook, especially John Stuart Mill’s arguments found in this week’s reading, and be as precise as you can.

  • Reflect on yourself and others:

Do you agree with that? Why or why not?

Do you find yourself agreeing with the utilitarian about the answer to one of the scenarios but not the other? If so, explain what accounts for that difference. Does this point to objections, limitations, or flaws in the utilitarian approach? Explain.

If you found yourself agreeing with the utilitarian about both scenarios, how would you defend your view against those that might have given different answers?

*600 words

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SW250 MSUM Mod 5 The Judge Movie Paper

Question Description

Your final submission must adhere to these technical requirements and reflect the template below:

• include the above topics;
• reflect the MFLE 5 template provided below;
• provide the required document header on page 1 only with all required identifying information; • have 1″ margins all around;
• be exactly 4 full, double-spaced pages of thoughtful, meaningful, and substantive analysis;
• Use 12 pitch font.

The attached file has the instructions, the rubric and the questions for the assignment.The page to be completed is page 7 and 17

Please follow all the instructions for the assignment in the attached file.Thank you.

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SW 250—Introduction to Social Welfare and Social Work Module 5 Focused Learning Exercise (M5FLE) PART 1—My WebQuest PART 2—My Critique Generalist Social Work Interventions “The Judge” Instructions M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued Contents M5FLE OVERVIEW ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 LEARNING OUTCOMES …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 GENERAL PURPOSE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 SPECIAL NOTE! ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 PART 1—My GSWIP …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 PART 2—My Critique …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3 LASC GROUNDING…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 4 CSWE LEARNING OUTCOMES DEVELOPED …………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 PART 1 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4 THE CASE STUDY …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 4 THE PROCESS FOR PART 1 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 5 RECOMMENDATIONS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5 EXAMPLES OF WEBQUEST RESOURCES ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 6 PART 1 PAPER STRUCTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 6 REQUIRED PART 1 CONTENT (E.G., PAPER SUBHEADINGS) …………………………………………………………………………………… 6 REQUIRED PART 1 PAPER TEMPLATE …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7 SUBMITTING PART 1 OF YOUR WEBQUEST TWICE ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 MY GRADING OF PART 1 OF YOUR WEBQUEST …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8 HOW TO USE THE M5FLE PART 1 GRADING RUBRIC ……………………………………………………………………………………………. 8 TABLE 1: M5FLE PART 1 RUBRIC ITEM SCORES……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 TABLE 2: M5FLE PART 1 FEEDBACK FOR GRADING RUBRIC…………………………………………………………………………………. 10 PART 2 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15 THE PROCESS FOR PART 2 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 PART 2 PAPER STRUCTURE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 15 REQUIRED PART 2 CONTENT…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16 REQUIRED PART 2 PAPER TEMPLATE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17 SUBMITTING PART 2 OF YOUR WEBQUEST ………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 MY GRADING OF PART 2 OF YOUR WEBQUEST …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18 HOW TO USE THE M5FLE PART 2 GRADING RUBRIC ………………………………………………………………………………………….. 18 TABLE 1: M5FLE PART 2 RUBRIC ITEM SCORES………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19 TABLE 2: M5FLE PART 2 Feedback for Grading Rubric………………………………………………………………………………………… 20 Page 2 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued M5FLE OVERVIEW LEARNING OUTCOMES This assignment aligns with learning outcomes in Units 1-14. GENERAL PURPOSE This WebQuest is an independent, inquiry-oriented learning exercise where students independently gather information that pertains to some topic, problem, challenge, then independently apply that information to explain the topic, solve the problem, or meet the challenge! This work is done “independently” so students practice self-sufficiency skills that will be expected of them in licensed practice in any profession-including social work. In this assignment students will first study the above documentary film “The Judge.” They will then choose one of the main clients depicted. Next, students will read the Kirst-Ashman & Hull overview of planned change in generalist practice (Chapter 1: pp 36-50, PDF is in D2L | Module 5 | M5FLE), then consult various written sources (for example, Unit 6 in our text on generalist social work practice, and/or another book, article, etc.). Then students will conduct a WebQuest to guide their development of a realistic generalist social work intervention plan (GSWIP) to assist their chosen main film client. NOTE: Information can come from many sources (e.g., books, articles, web sites, social media, and the like), but the WebQuest part of the assignment involves information exclusively from online sources. SPECIAL NOTE! Though your grades for SW250 assignments are always confidential, your ungraded, name-redacted M5FLE WebQuest will be read/critiqued by classmates. This is because the social work intervention plan you develop in PART 1—My GSWIP will be made public in redacted format in the WebQuest library which will be our repository of all class WebQuests. Then students will select one paper from this repository to critique as the basis for their PART 2—The WebQuest Critique. However, please know that student(s) critique of your work will remain confidential and read only by me. PART 1—My GSWIP Simply, each student must first develop her/his intervention plan for PART 1 as directed below. Then each student will upload two versions of this PART 1 assignment into two separate D2L Drop boxes: (1) a version with her/his name into My WebQuest for DrG’s Grading; and (2) a name-redacted version into “My Name-Redacted WebQuest for the Quest Library for My Colleagues to Critique.” PART 2—My Critique Then for PART 2 of this assignment, students will review several/many WebQuests that colleagues submitted anonymously (name-redacted) into the class group drop box, then choose only one to critique. I will then grade each student’s critique of her/his colleague’s work. Please keep reading, though, to better understand assignment specifics! Page 3 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued LASC GROUNDING All SW250 assignments build on basic Liberal Studies (LASC) competencies so students develop a working knowledge of social welfare and social work in American Society. CSWE LEARNING OUTCOMES DEVELOPED Through its Education Policy and Accreditation Standards (2015), the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) has determined nine common practice competencies that include thirty-one requisite practice behaviors—all of which are integral to competent licensed generalist social work. What is more, CSWE requires that these competencies and their practice behaviors be taught in social work training programs nationwide as a condition for accreditation. Therefore, SW250 guides students’ initial inquiry into social welfare and licensed professional generalist social work in a fashion consistent with that envisioned by CSWE. Consequently, the following practice behaviors are nurtured in SW250, and in particular through this assignment: PB 2: use reflection/self-regulation to manage personal values and maintain practice professionalism PB 3: show professional demeanor (behavior; appearance; and communication) PB 4: use technology ethically and appropriately to facilitate practice outcomes PB 6: apply/communicate understanding of the importance of diversity and difference PB 8: apply self-awareness/self-regulation to manage personal biases and values PB 9: apply understanding of justice to advocate for human rights PB 14: Identify social policy that impacts well-being, service delivery, access PART 1 THE CASE STUDY Students will study the feature film “The Judge” which is linked into D2L “Module 5 | M5FLE.” This engaging feature film shows how individual (micro), family (messo), and social (macro) problems coalesce to pose significant, complex challenges to clients. Your task is to explore the process of building a viable GSWIP to use to assist any one of the main characters in the film. You are free to choose which character, but focus on only one for this assignment. Following the process below, students will apply content studied this term (e.g., social welfare, social work, person-in-environment, human diversity, religion, poverty) and additional web-based content to build their GSWIP. Be sure to involve in your GSWIP specific social work resources in our FM Page 4 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued community (e.g., specific names of social work agencies / programs that you identify)—this will be part of the Web Quest portion of the work! While completing this task, pretend you are the licensed generalist social worker, and your film character who is now your client lives in Fargo/Moorhead. THE PROCESS FOR PART 1 These steps will guide your GSWIP development: Review this assignment’s grading rubric for this assignment below before doing anything; Carefully study Chapter 1 of the Kirst-Ashman & Hull text book (LO 1-14, pp. 34-50) Carefully study the documentary film “The Judge;” Choose one character from the film and compose a brief overview of her/his role in the movie (Note: Person-in-Environment perspective); Identify 1 main client problem of this character to address, and compose a brief overview of the problem; Watch the film a second time to study closely your specific character, her/his bio-psycho-social self (a.k.a., person-in-environment), and the interplay of each as components of the identified client problem; Take notes linking specific movie content with materials studied this semester-you will include this in your paper; Complete a WebQuest to study how to build a GSWIP (you will cite all resources used); o Explore web resource to help you understand how to build your GSWIP; o Identify work programs/other resources in the community that might help the client; Based on your WebQuest, summarize briefly/generally GSWIP components you learned about with no reference to your client (I want to verify you understand GSWIP); Then build a specific GSWIP for your main character addressing the chosen problem; Identify in your GSWIP a specific social work program in Fargo/Moorhead that can help; Visit that program’s physical facility & web site to study its purpose; List 3 specific program services you would use from that program; Justify your choice: explain the service and how exactly it will address the client’s problem; Discuss how you expect your client will benefit from each specific program service; and Conclude your work with an overview of what you have learned from the assignment. RECOMMENDATIONS As you study this movie, analyze scenes and record your thoughts in detailed case notes to use later as case evidence to support/justify your professional GSWIP actions. You may work alone or in small groups with beverages and treats, but your submitted GSWIP must be your own! Student GSWIPs that are similar in any way and not unique will receive an “F” for the assignment with no opportunity to redo the work. Page 5 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued Also, for this analysis more credit is given when specific movie scenes are provided throughout as evidence supporting all clinical conclusions! Like clinicians, you are gathering evidence to support your treatment plan. EXAMPLES OF WEBQUEST RESOURCES    Google, YouTube News outlets (e.g., New York Times, Wall Street Journal, People Magazine, etc.) Social media postings (e.g., Facebook, Twitter, Podcasts, etc.), for example… PART 1 PAPER STRUCTURE        look exactly like the M5FLE PART 1 template below; header must have all information and only be on page one; 5 double-spaced pages of narrative exactly—no more, no less—with page numbers; Reference list on page 6; 1″ margins all around; Font size 12; and University level writing is required for credit. REQUIRED PART 1 CONTENT (E.G., PAPER SUBHEADINGS)        Overview of the chosen character; The focus client problem for the social work intervention; Overview of building a social work intervention plan; The specific GSWIP for the client: the specific program and three services; How this client will benefit from these specific program services; What I have learned about generalist social work from this assignment; and Reference list. Page 6 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued REQUIRED PART 1 PAPER TEMPLATE SW 250 Module 5 Focused Learning Exercise My WebQuest-PART 1 “The Judge” My GSWIP Current semester identification Student’s first & last name THE CLIENT Person-in-Environment overview of the chosen character (Insert your narrative here; ½ of page 1) Overview of the client’s main problem for the social work intervention (Insert your narrative here; ½ of page 1) THE GSWIP Overview of building a social work intervention plan (Insert your narrative here; all of page 2) The specific GSWIP for the client: the specific program and three services (Insert your narrative here; all of page 3) How this client will benefit from these specific program services (Insert your narrative here; all of page 4) STUDENT LEARNING What I have learned about generalist social work from this assignment (Insert your narrative here; ½ of page 5) Reference List (Page 6) Page ____ Page 7 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued SUBMITTING PART 1 OF YOUR WEBQUEST TWICE Once finalized, create and submit your PDF WebQuest file into D2L using these steps:  create two PDFs i. export the MS Word document or use Save as to create 2 PDF documents; – Create one with your name for grading submission (see below); – Create a second with your name redacted for group drop box submission;  deposit each PDF in the designated assignment drop box (no emailed submissions): i. one name-redacted PDF copy into the D2L group drop box into “M5FLE NameRedacted WebQuest PDF for the WebQuest library for my colleagues to critique.” Once submitted, the next drop box will magically appear! Take care not to make a mistake so you remain anonymous! ii. Once you have uploaded your name-redacted PDF file in step “i” above, the D2L drop box “M5FLE WebQuest PDF with my name for DrG’s Grading” will magically appear so you can upload one copy of this same PDF only this time with your name for me to grade.  ensure you have in hand your D2L confirmation email that is generated following submission;  file your D2L confirmation email in a safe place as this is your evidence of submission;  complete the entire process by the date/time deadline listed with the assignment drop box. MY GRADING OF PART 1 OF YOUR WEBQUEST This assignment is worth up to ≤100 points contingent you your name-redacted PDF upload into the drop box “M5FLE Name-Redacted WebQuest PDF for My Colleagues.” I will use the grading rubric below to guide my grading so study it BEFORE starting your paper to learn more about what I am expecting in this work! HOW TO USE THE M5FLE PART 1 GRADING RUBRIC What follows are two tables: the first contains all rubric item scores in this assignment and their labels; the second contains feedback for each item score. Using your specific rubric item scores for this assignment, first find each item’s value in Table 1 below, then read its corresponding feedback in Table 2 in order to understand how to improve your competency in that particular item. Page 8 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued TABLE 1: M5FLE PART 1 RUBRIC ITEM SCORES Item 0 points 6 points 8 points 10 points Paper structure Extensive structural issues Many structural issues Few structural issues Complies with all structural requirements Topic Adherence All or most sections elements missing Many sections elements missing Few sections elements missing No sections elements missing Writing quality Extensive writing issues Many writing issues Few writing issues No writing issues Client overview No client overview Limited client overview Adequate client overview Extensive client overview Client problem No problem overview Limited problem overview Adequate client problem overview Extensive client problem overview. SW Intervention plan overview No overview of plan parts Limited overview of plan parts Adequate general overview of SW intervention plans Extensive general overview of SW intervention plans Specific client GSWIP No client-specific SW intervention plan Limited client-specific SW intervention plan Adequate client GSWIP Extensive client-specific SW intervention plan is provided. Anticipated Client benefits No client benefits listed Limited client benefits listed Adequate discussion of 1-2 anticipated client benefits Three meaningful client benefits listed-one for each specific service What student learned No discussion of learning Limited discussion of learning Adequate discussion of student learning Meaningful and specific discussion of learning Reference list No reference list provided Minimal reference list provided Adequate reference list Extensive reference list Page 9 M5FLE—My WebQuest Instructions-Continued TABLE 2: M5FLE PART 1 FEEDBACK FOR GRADING RUBRIC Item Paper structure 0 points 6 points 8 points 10 points Like any professional document, there are basic formatting requirements that pertain. For example: (a) to encourage editing, there are length constraints; (b) submissions require certain formatting and content; and (c) ordered headings in the body of the work assist the writer and reader. However, this submission shows no evidence of compliance with required standards. Please reread the M5FLE PART 1 instructions and template to identify where this lacks fidelity with requirements. And in future work please read and follow instructions scrupulo …
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University of Maryland Experienced Violence Due to Alcohol Consumption HW

Question Description

1) I have personally never had any experiences with alcohol and violence. I grew up in a home that did not have alcohol. I have known and seen friends that I grew up with that had alcohol in their homes, unfortunately some off those homes also had violence. I never firsthand saw any acts of violence; however, I could see the difference in the atmosphere of the home whenever I was there. It personally made me grateful for the fact that I was not exposed to such violence in my life. I would say that alcohol itself does not turn one person violent, there are a lot of other contributing factors that make someone violent after consuming alcohol. I do believe that alcohol can take someone out of their normal state of mind, which is why you are not allowed to drink and drive. I am a firm believer that it is not an excuse for any actions that someone may take while under the influence. I have been out many times and have seen people who once they drink a few alcoholic drinks and they become obnoxious and at times they start looking for a fight. I can see how alcohol can play a role, but as I stated before I do not believe it is the only contributing factor.

Jorge

2) Rarely have I experienced violence due to alcohol consumption firsthand. However, my mother and father both have told me stories about violent situations that were created or fueled by alcohol that they had experienced when they were younger. Because of situations like these, children create psychological behaviors that transfer over to adulthood (Crespi & Ponzetti, 2003). In the past, both sides of my family have associated alcohol consumption with both hardship, happiness, and anything in between which resulted in negatively impacting the lives of the children that witnessed the events. My parents were both witnesses to family feuds that were a results of binge drinking. My parents witnessed family members being pulled out of bars, fighting at family events, and being sent to the hospital all because of alcohol consumption. These episodes or violent situations were often times created because of alcohol dependency. A majority of these situations were created because a family member was unhappy with how much another family member consumed alcohol. People who experience these kinds of events at a young age can grow up to develop permanent psychological behaviors (Korsmeyer & Kranzler, 2009).

In my experience I have only witnessed alcohol cause violence in other peoples’ lives. I have never directly been a part of an altercation because of alcohol, but I have experienced other people hurt themselves, or other people, because they were intoxicated. Consuming large amounts of alcohol leads to aggression (Korsmeyer & Kranzler, 2009), and because of this I have seen plenty of people engage in physical altercations that would have never happened if they were not intoxicated. While attending university, I experienced plenty of aggression related to alcohol consumption.

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Social Inequalities in A Global Society Focusing on Social Class Homework

Question Description

This assignment aligns with the following course objectives:

  • Evaluate the nature and significance of social inequalities in a global society focusing on social class, race, age, gender and other areas of diversity;
  • Find, evaluate and cite appropriate academic resources for research in written assignments and oral presentations;
  • Apply the sociological perspective by using collaborative problem-solving assignments.

Assignment Background:

Social inequality can be defined as the unequal distribution of power, privilege and social status among various groups in society. Social inequality is pervasive as the consequences of unequal treatment and resource distribution are reflected in all social institutions. Thus, different outcomes are experienced by different groups of people in the educational system, the criminal justice system, health care industry, the media and political and economic arrangements. Groups of people based on age, race, gender, social class, sex, or sexual orientation experience life differently based on social inequalities.

This assignment will require you to examine, discuss and explain a pattern of social inequality in a form of media. There are many themes of social inequality that are often incorporated into movies, documentaries, films, plays, music and other forms of media. The use of these themes in media allows viewers to see how issues of racism, sexism and other forms of social inequality affect the lives of the characters and their social experiences. Movies, films and other forms of media bring issues of social inequality to our attention and we are better able to understand a range of social problems.

As you prepare for this media assignment, consider the following list of movies that reflect areas of social inequality. Keep in mind that you can select a movie, documentary, film, play, or music CD for your review.

Examples: (You do not have to select any of these… only examples)

Racial Inequality: The Help, 42

Gender Inequality: Confirmation, Hidden Figures

Social Class: Titanic, The Notebook

Sexuality: Milk, The Stonewall Riots

Purpose:
The purpose of this assignment is to have students demonstrate an understanding of a form of social inequality based on age, race, social class, gender, or sex, sexual orientation presented in a movie, film, documentary, book, play or music CD. In addition, specific General Education objectives will be met as they are aligned with course objectives in SOCL 101.

Audience:
The audience for this assignment is anyone who is interested in acquiring information about patterns of pervasive social inequality based on age, race, social class, gender, sex, sexual orientation that can be empirically analyzed through the media using research materials.

Assignment Directions:

Select a movie, film, documentary, book, play or musician or musical group that addresses an area of social inequality based on age, race, gender, social class, sex, sexual orientation etc. (If you select a music CD, you must provide an assessment of at least four songs on the selected CD.) Your selection can be a classical or a contemporary selection. Thus, there are no year requirements for your selection.

You will be composing a 3 page paper examining an issue of social inequality based on age, race, gender, social class, sexual orientation etc. and how they are represented in media. In your essay, you should address each of the following areas.

  1. How does your selection relate to a specific area of social inequality based on age, race, gender, social class, or sexual orientation? Are there multiple forms of social inequality represented in your selection? If so, please make the connections of intersectionality throughout the body of your paper.
  2. Listed below are questions that can serve as a guide as you develop the paper.
    – Who are the main characters in your selection and how do they experience a form of social inequality? Provide specific examples from your selection that demonstrate the form of inequality in practice.
    – How do the characters respond to being treated unequally?
    – What steps are taken in your selection regarding trying to overcome this form of social inequality?
    – Do the characters mobilize, start a social movement, or take action in some other organized way as to challenge systemic oppression? Draw parallels between the plot and themes of your selection as they relate to the form of social inequality.
    – What are the outcomes of these actions?
  3. Incorporate and explain five different sociological concepts related to social inequality within your paper. Highlight these concepts in bold print. Select and apply concepts that are relevant to your selected area of social inequality. For example, specific concepts associated gender inequality could include sexism, patriarchy, gender role socialization, pay gap, sexual harassment, glass ceiling etc. The purpose of using and highlighting the concepts is to demonstrate that you can make the connection between your selection and sociological concepts provided in the textbook or in the module readings as they relate to a specific form of social inequality by using concepts from the chapters.
  4. Use one sociological theory (structural functionalism, conflict, symbolic interaction, feminist, queer theory etc.) to analyze your selection. Draw parallels between the plot and themes in your selection as it relates to the underlying premise of the selected social theory.

ASSIGNMENT SPECIFICATIONS:

  • Minimum three pages typed in Times New Roman 12-pt font, double-spaced with 1” margins. The references are not included in the assigned page length.
  • APA style format and documentation for parenthetical and end of paper citations.
  • Use your textbook as one source for this assignment, specifically one of the chapters on social inequality that provides information on your selected topic.
  • Select two additional sources from the library databases.
    One (1) article should be from a peer-reviewed scholarly journal.

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University of California Race Social Construct Reflection Paper

Question Description

In order to engage with these prompts, I recommend that you consider the readings with the fol-lowing queries:
1. Understand how each author is defining race
2. What is his/her key argument?
3. How are these media alike or different? Do the relate to any other concepts we’ve pre-viously learned?
4. What are the flaws (theoretical or practical) in their claims?

Write a reflection following the requirement above for the two text that I upload. 100 words for each

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S • _ ,,, Audre Lorde, “Age, Race, Class and Sex: Women Redefinin Diffe g rence,” in Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches (Freedom, CA: Crossing Press, 1984), pp. 114123.__ : Age, Race, Class, and Sex: Women Redefining Difference* ‘ , : ,. – ‘ ‘ . I’ , : ,‘ ‘ r ‘ , . history conditions us to see hu man differences in simplistic opposition to each “other: dom inant/subordinate, good/bad, up/down, superior/inferior. In a society where the good is defined in terms of profit rather than in terms of human need, there must always be some group of people who, through systematized oppression, can be made to feel surplus, to occupy the place of the dehumanized inferior. Within this society, that group is made up of Black and Third World people, working-class people, older people, and women. As a forty-nine-year-old Black lesbian feminist socialist mother of two, including one boy, and a member of an interracial couple, I usually find myself a part of some group defined as other, deviant, inferior, or just plain wrong. Traditionally, in american society, it is the members of oppressed, objectified groups who are expected to stretch out and bridge the gap between the actualities of our lives and the consciousness of our oppressor. For in order to survive, those of us for whom oppres sion is as american as apple pie have always had to be watchers, to become familiar with the language and manners of the op pressor, even sometimes adopting them for some illusion of protection. Whenever the need for some pretense of communica tion arises, those who profit from our oppression call upon us to share our knowledge with them. In other words, it is the respon sibility of the oppressed to teach the oppressors their mistakes. I MUCH OF WESTERN EUROPEAN . Paper delivered at the Copeland Colloquium, Amherst College, April 1980. 114 : AGE, RACE, CLAsS, AND SEX 115 am responsible for educating teachers who dismiss my children’s culture in school. Black and Third World people are expected to educate white people as to our humanity. Women are expected to educate men. Lesbians and gay men are expected to educate the heterosexual world. The oppressors maintain their position and evade responsibility for their own actions. Ther e is a constant drain of energy which might be better used in redefining ourselves and devising realistic scenarios for altering the present and constructing the future. Institutionalized rejection of difference is an abso lute necessijy in a profit economy which needs outsiders as surp lus people. As members of such an economy, we have all been programmed to respond to the human differences between us with fear and loathing and to handle that difference in one of three ways: ignore it, and if that is not possible, copy it if we think it is domi nant, or destroy it if we think it is subordinate. But we have no• patterns for relating across our human differenc es as equals. As a result, those differences have been misnamed and misused in the service of separation and confusion. Certainly there are very real differences betw een us of race, age, and sex. But it is not those differences between us that are separating us. It is rather our refusal to recognize those dif ferences, and to examine the distortions whic h result from our misnaming them and their effects upon hum an behavior and expectation. Racism, the belief in the inherent superiority of one race over all others and thereby the right to dominance. Sexism, the belief in the inherent superiority of one sex over the other and thereby the right to dominance. Ageisr,t Heterosexism. Elitism. Clas sism. It is a lifetime pursuit for each one of us to extract these distor tions from our living at the same time as we recognize, reclaim, and define those differences upon which they are imposed. For we have all been raised in a society where thos e distortions were endemic within our living. Too often, we pour the energy needed for recognizing and exploring difference into pretending those differences are insurmountable barriers, or that they do not exist at all. This results in a voluntary isola tion, or false and treacherous connections. Either way, we do not develop tools for using human difference as a springboard for creative change S • . .. * S . I ‘S 55., ‘ i I . 1 16 ,. . , ‘ . . . ; . . fl : : : . .. I ,. . . , . SIsmR OUTSIDER within otir lives. We speak not of human difference, but of human deviance. Somewhere, on the edge of consciousness, there is what I call a mythical norm, which each one of us within our hearts knows “that is not me.” In america, this norm is usually defined as white, thin, male, young, heterosexual, christian, and financially secure. It i with this mythical norm that the trappings of power reside within this society. Those of us who stand outside that power often identify one way in which we are different, and we assume that to be the primary cause of all oppression, forgetting other distortions around difference, some of which we ourselves may be practising. By and large within the women’s movement today, white women focus upon their oppression as women and ignore differences of race, sexual preference, class, and age. There is a pretense to a homogeneity of experience covered by the word sisterhood that does not in fact exist. Unacknowledged class differences rob women of each others’ energy and creative insight. Recently a women’s magazine col lective made the decision for one issue to print only prose, saying poetry was a less “rigorous” or “serious” art form. Yet even the form our creativity takes is often a class issue. Of all the art forms,. poetry is the most economical. It is thç one which is the most secret, which requires the least physical labor, the least material, and the one which can be done between shifts, in the hospital pantry, on the subway, and on scraps of surplus paper. Over the last few years, writing a novel on tight finances, I came to appreciate the enormous differences in the material demands between poetry and prose. As we reclaim our literature, poetry has been the major voice of poor, working class, and Colored women. A room of one’s own may be a necessity for writing prose, but so are reams of paper, a typewriter, and plenty of time. The actual requirements to produce the visual arts also help determine, along class lines, whose art is whose. In this day of inflated prices for material, who are our sculptors, our painters, our photographers? When wespeak of a broadly based women’s culture, we need to be aware of the effect of class and economic differences on the supplies available for producing art. As we move toward creating a society within which we can each flourish, ageism is another distortion of relationship which AGE, RACE, CLAss, AND SEX 117 interferes without vision. By ignoring the past, we are encour aged to repeat its mistakes. The “generation gap” is an important social tool for any repressive society. If the younger members of a community view the older members as contemptible or suspect or excess, they will never be able to join hands and ex amine the living memories of the community, nor ask the all im portant question, “Why?” This gives rise to a historical amnesia that keeps us working to invent the wheel every time we have to go to the store for bread. We find ourselves having to repeat and relearn the same old lessons over and over that our mothers did because we do not pass on what we have learned, or because we are unable to listen. For instance, how many times has this all been said before? For another, who would have believed that once again our daughters are allowing their bodies to be hampered and purgatoried by girdles and high heels and hobble skirts? Ignoring the differences of race between women and the im plications of those differences presents the most serious threat to the mobilization ofwomen’s joint power. As white women ignore their built-in privilege of whiteness and define woman in terms of their own experience alone, then women of Color become “other,” the outsider whose experience and tradition is too “alien” to comprehend. An example of this is the signal absence of the experience of women of Color as a resource for women’s studies courses. The literature ofwomen of Color is seldom included in women’s literature courses and almost never in other literature courses, nor in women’s studies as a whole. All too often, the excuse given is that the literatures of women of Color can only be taught by Colored women, or that they are too difficult to understand, or that classes cannot “get into” them because they come out of experiences that are “too different.” I have heard this argument presented by white women of otherwise quite clear intelligence, women who seem to have no trouble at all teaching and reviewing work that comes out of the vastly different experiences of Shakespeare, Moliere, Dostoyefsky, and Aristophanes. Surely there must be some other explanation. This is a very complex question, but I believe one of the reasons white women have such difficulty reading Black 118 SIsmR OUTSIDER AGE, RACE, CLASS, AND SEX 119 women’s work is because of their reluctance to see Black women as women and different from themselves. To examine Black women’s literature effectively requires that we be seen as whole people in our actual complexities as individuals, as women, as human rather than as one of those problematic but familiar stereotypes provided in this society in place of genunine images of Black women. And I believe this holds true for the literatures of other women of Color who are not Black. The literatures of all women of Color recreate the textures of our lives, and many white women are heavily invested in ignor ing the real differences. For as long as any difference between us means one of us must be inferior, then the recognition of any difference must be fraught with guilt. To allow women of Color to step out of stereotypes is too guilt provoking, for it threatens the complacency of those women who view oppression only in terms of sex. Refusing to recognize difference makes it impossible to see the different problems and pitfalls facing us as women. Thus, in a patriarchal power system where whiteskin privilege is a major prop, the entrapments used to neutralize Black women and white women are not the same. For example, it is easy for Black women to be used by the power structure against Black men, not because they are men, but because they are Black. Therefore, for Black women, it is necessary at all times to separate the needs of the oppressor from our own legitimate conflicts within our communities. This same problem does not exist for white women. Black women and men have shared racist oppression and still share it, although in different ways. Out of that shared oppression we have developed joint defenses and joint vulnerabilities to each other that are not duplicated in the white community, with the exception of the relationship between Jewish women and Jewish men. On the other hand, white women face the pitfall of being seduced into joining the oppressor under the pretense of sharing power. This possibility does not exist in the same way for women of Color. The tokenism that is sometimes extended to us is not an invitation to join power; our racial “otherness” is a visible reality that makes that quite clear. For white women — — . there is a wider range of pretended choices and rewards for iden tifying with patriarchal power and its tools. Today, with the defeat of ERA, the tightening economy, and increased conservatism, it is easier once again for white women to believe the dangerous fantasy that if you are good enough, pretty enough, sweet enough, quiet enough, teach the children to behave, hate the right people, and marry the right men, then you will be allowed to co-exist with patriarchy in relative peace, at least until a man needs your job or theneighborhood rapist happens along. And true, unless one lives and loves in the trenches it is difficult to remember that the war against dehu manization is ceaseless. But Black women and our children know the fabric of our lives is stitched with violence and with hatred, that there is no rest. We do not deal with it only on the picket lines, or in dark midnight alleys, or in the places where we dare to verbalize our resistance. For us, increasingly, violence weaves through the daily tissues of our living in the supermarket, in the classroom, in the elevator, in the clinic and the schoolyard, from the plumber, the baker, the saleswoman, the bus drivr, thebank teller, the waitress who does not serve us. Some problems we share as women, some we do not. You fear your children will grow up to join the patriarchy and testify against you, we fear our children will be dragged from a car and shot down in the street, and you will turn your backs upon the reasons they are dying. The threat of difference has been no less blinding to people of Color. Those of us who are Black must see that the reality of our lives and our struggle does not make us immune to the er rors of ignoring and misnaming difference. Within Black cornmunities where racism is a living reality, differences among us often seem dangerous and suspect. The need for unity is often misnamed as a need for homogeneity, and a Black feminist vision mistaken for betrayal of our common interests as a people. Because of the continuous battle against racial erasure that Black women and Black men share, some Black women still refuse to recognize that we are also oppressed as women, and that sexual hostility against Black women is practiced not only — 120 SIsmR OUTSIDER \ : I : ••H : : ‘ by the white racist society, but implemented within our Black communities as well. It is a disease striking the heart of Black nationhood, and silence will not make it disappear. Exacerbated by racism and the pressures of powerlessness, violence against Black women and children often becomes a standard within our communities, one by which manliness can be measured. But these woman-hating acts are rarely discussed as crimes against Black women. As a group, women of Color are the lowest paid wage earners in america. We are the primary targets of abortion and steriliza tion abuse, here and abroad. In certain parts of Africa, small girls are still being sewed shut between their legs to keep them docile and for men’s pleasure. This is known as female circurnci sion, and it is not a cultural affair as the late Jomo Kenyatta in. sisted, it is a crime against Black women. Black women’s literature is full of the pain of frequent assault, not only by a racist patriarchy, but also by Black men. Yet the necessity for and history of shared battle have made us, Black women, particularly vulnerable to the false accusation that anti sexist is antiBlack. Meanwhile, womanhating as a recourse of the powerless is sapping strength from Black communities, and our very lives. Rape is on the increase, reported and unreported, and rape is not aggressIve sexuality, it is sexualized aggression. As Kalamu ya Salaam, a Black male writer points out, “As long as male domination exists, rape will exist. Only women revolting and men made conscious of their responsibility to fight sexism can collectively stop rape.”* Differences between ourselves as Black women are also being misnamed and used to separate us from one another. As a Black lesbian feminist comfortable with the many different ingre dients of my identity, and a woman committed to racial and sexual freedom from oppression, I find I am constantly being encouraged to pluck out some one aspect of myself and present this as the meaningful whole, eclipsing or denying the other parts of self. But this is a destructive and fragmenting way to live, My fullest concentration of energy is available to me only when I integrate all the parts of who 1 am, openly, allowing * From “Rape: A Radical Analysis, An African-American Perspective” by Kalamu ya Salaam in Black Books Bulletin, vol. 6, no. 4(1980). AGE, RACE, CLASS, AND SEX 121 power from particular sources of my living to flow back and forth freely through all my different selves, without the restric tions of externally imposed definition. Only then can I bring myself and my energies as a whole to the service of those strug gles which I embrace as part of my living. A fear of lesbians, or of being accused of being a lesbian, has led many Black women into testifying against themselves. It has led some of us into destructive alliances, and others into despair and isolation. In the white women’s communities, heterosexism is sometimes a result of identifying with the white patriarchy, a rejection of that interdependence between women-identified women which allows the self to be, rather than to be used in the service of men. Sometimes it reflects a die-hard belief in the protective coloration of heterosexual relationships, sometimes a self-hate which all women have to fight against, taught us from birth. Although elements of these attitudes exist for all women, there are particular resonances of heterosexism and homopho bia among Black women. Despite the fact that woman-bonding has a long and honorable history in the African and Africanamerican communities, and despite the knowledge and accomplishments of many strong and creative women-identified Black women in the political, social and cultural fields, heterosexual Black women often tend to ignore or discount the existence and work of Black lesbians. Part of this attitude has come from an understandable terror of Black male attack within the close confines of Black society, where the punishment for any female self-assertion is still to be accused of being a lesbian and therefore unworthy of the attention or support of the scarce Black male. But part of this need to misname and ig nore Black lesbians comes from a very real fear that openly women-identified Black women who are no longer dependent upon men for their self-definition may well reorder our whole concept of social relationships. Black women who once insisted that lesbianism was a white woman’s problem now insist that Black lesbians are a threat to Black nationhood, are consorting with the enemy, are basically un-Black. These accusations, coming from the very women to whom we look for deep and real understanding, have served to I: ZLLZJ – IL / 122 SIsTER OUTSIDER AGE, RACE, CLAss, AND SEX keep many Black lesbians in hiding, caught between the racism of white women and the homophobia of their sisters. Often, their work has been ignored, trivialized, or misnamed, as with the work of Angelina Grimke, Alice Dunbar..Nelson, Lorrain e Hansberry. Yet women-bonded women have always been some part of the power of Black communities, from our unmar ried aunts to the amazons of Dahomey. And it is certainly not Black lesbians who are assault ing women and raping children and grandmothers on the streets of our communities. Across this country, as in Boston during the spring of 1979 following the unsolved murders of twelve Black women, Black lesbians are spearheading movements against violence agains t Black women. What are the particular details within each of our lives that can be scrutinized and altered to help bring about change ? How do we redefine difference for all women? It is not our differe nces which separate women, but our reluctance to recognize those differences and to deal effectively with the distortions which have resulted from the ignoring and misnaming of those dif ferences. As a tool of social control, women have been encouraged to recognize only one area of human difference as legitimate, those differences which exist between women and men. And we have learned to deal across those differences wi …
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Clare Brilliant Imperfection Book Discussion

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with a paragraph in which you pull a key term and describe Clare’s use of the term, along with any questions or observations about the section. As always, be sure to ground your statements in the text.

you can go to https://b-ok.cc/ to search book Clare Brilliant Imperfection.

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SOC412 Grand Canyon Protestant Denominational Belief Systems Chart

Question Description

Complete the “Protestant Denominational Belief Systems” chart.

Provide a minimum of three to five scholarly sources to support your content.

This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion.

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SOC-412 Protestant Beliefs Systems Chart Assignment Description: Part I: Protestant Beliefs Systems Chart 1) Read through the “Distinctive Protestant Beliefs and Practices Chart” on page 66. 2) Select two Protestant denominations from pages 68 to 88. 3) List by bullet point your selected denomination—the denominational distinctives in each category of the chart. DENOMINATION 1._______________ DENOMINATION 2. _________________ Beliefs Lifestyle Rituals Organization © 2016. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. Part II: Comparative Analysis Write a 200-300-word comparative analysis of the two denominations you selected. References SOC-412 Topic 3 Protestant Denominational Belief Systems chart Scoring Guide REQUIREMENTS: POSSIBLE Instructions: Complete the “Protestant Denominational Belief Systems” chart. Provide a minimum of three to five scholarly sources to support your content. This assignment uses a rubric. Please review the rubric prior to beginning the assignment to become familiar with the expectations for successful completion. Prepare this assignment according to the guidelines found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. An abstract is not required. You are required to submit this assignment to Turnitin. Refer to the directions in the Student Success Center. 1) Denomination 1: 50 Beliefs, Lifestyle, Rituals, Organization 2) Denomination 2: 50 3) Beliefs, Lifestyle, Rituals, Organization 4) Comparative Analysis: Write a 200-300-word comparative analysis of the two denominations you selected. 50 While APA format is not required for the body of this assignment, solid academic writing is expected, and documentation of sources should be presented using APA formatting guidelines, which can be found in the APA Style Guide, located in the Student Success Center. 10 © 2016. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. ACTUAL TOTAL 160 Instructor Comments: © 2016. Grand Canyon University. All Rights Reserved. …
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University of California Irvine Sociology Race and Racism Essay

Question Description

This past week we focused on race and racism. These are very difficult subjects, and the topics of race and racism are multi-layered. Addressing race and racism in the context of a college classroom presents us with a unique set of challenges. But it seems now, more than ever, we need to engage in open, honest dialogue about these issues.

You will be given three possible essay topics to write about. You have to choose one of them. The three possibilities are:

1. In class on Friday, I showed a slide that said, “If we all treated each other better, would that solve racism — is it enough to treat everyone as an individual?” Please provide specific reasons for whatever position you take on this matter. Be sure to integrate course readings into your answer.

2. On Wednesday during class, I administered a racial privilege quiz. The point of the quiz was to identify people with racial advantage and disadvantage. This quiz was like a diagnostic. It was meant to determine if, in your everyday life, you have signs and symptoms of racial advantage or disadvantage. What score did you receive on the quiz? Do you think that score accurately represents the forms of racial advantage and/or disadvantage you experience in your daily life? Why or why not? (Note: For this essay option, you do not have to integrate course readings, unless you believe it is necessary).

3. From our course readings for this week, both Blumer and Bonilla-Silva claim that racism is not just about “ideology” or individual feelings. Citing from each of the readings, respond to the following: How do this week’s readings challenge “commonsense” or popular ideas about racism?

Please clearly indicate which essay option (#1, 2, or 3) you are answering.

This essay must be between 500-600 words. Submit your finished essays to Canvas before 9am, Friday, November 22nd.

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Glendale Community College Gang Violence Sociology Analysis Essay

Question Description

Throughout the semester, you will find and then analyze articles that exemplify any 10 concepts (or 5, if you’re doing Service Learning) from our list of options, which are drawn primarily from Best’s book. If there is a concept that you want to explore that isn’t on this list, please consult with me to see if we can make it a possibility!

An article can only be used once, and are ideally from this calendar year. Articles should be found in newspapers; in news magazines such as Time, Newsweek, and U.S. News and World Report; or on online news sites such as CNN.com, FoxNews.com, and ABCNews.com.

Note that you can select a troubling condition of interest to stick to all semester, or you can switch it up constantly and have each of your analyses be on different troubling conditions. Whichever approach you choose, I recommend that you find a troubling condition, or multiple troubling conditions, that you’re passionate about and want to learn more about during your internet searches for articles!

For each analysis, please be sure to explain/define the concept and make clear connections between the concept and the article. Quoting should be kept to a minimum, and each analysis should be about 1.5-2 pages double-spaced. Check out this sample analysis to get a sense of what’s expected for each of these analyses.

Article: https://theconversation.com/why-do-young-people-jo…

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Umass Boston TV Special TED Talks Education Video Analysis Homework

Question Description

View two of the talks in the TED talk series about education: https://www.ted.com/playlists/125/tv_special_ted_talks_educatio Write a brief summary and a response to each of them. Each response should be 1 page (That means a total of two pages.), double-spaced. You can only earn full credit if you make a clear connection about each of the two videos to the assigned chapter for this week.

Full credit will ONLY be awarded for those who make a clear connection to the assigned chapter(on education).

Textbook: Conley, Dalton. 2018. You May Ask Yourself: An Introduction to Thinking Like a Sociologist. 6th Edition. WW Norton Publishing. ISBN # 978-0-393-69145-0

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